THE MUDDY BAKER DARK CHOCOLATE – STOUT FLOAT

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Nothing says summer refreshment quite like an ice cream float. And while root beer and vanilla may have floated our childhood boat, we’ve been experimenting with other types of beer. Since ACME Ice Cream calls Bellingham home, we decided to partner with our friends at Aslan Brewing Company to create this absolutely decadent treat. Rich, velvety dark chocolate ice cream – made with three kinds of Guittard chocolate – doused with Aslan Brewing Company’s malty American Stout, brimming with roasted coffee and chocolate flavor and a hint of piney notes from the hops. It’s smooth on smooth.

 

The ice cream float was invented in the late 1800’s. Several stories have circulated about its origins. One states that Robert McCay Green of Philadelphia was selling flavored drinks at the Franklin Institute’s semi-centennial celebration. The day was hot, and he ran out of flavoring, substituting in vanilla ice cream from a nearby vendor, thus inventing a soda float. Another story claims that in 1893, Frank J. Wisner of Colorado’s Cripple Creek Brewing noticed that the snowy peaks on Colorado’s Cow Mountain looked like scoops of ice cream floating in soda. The next day he combined vanilla ice cream with root beer, calling it the “Black Cow.”

 

There are several other legends regarding the origin of the soda float, but regardless of who made it first, ACME Ice Cream takes floats to the next level. Our thick, air-free ice cream melts slowly, lasting until the last drop of bubbly liquid and then some. Combining stout’s mellow, malty sweetness with Guittard’s rich dark chocolate makes for a float of epically indulgent proportions. While the Rocky Mountains may be credited for an early version of this dessert beverage, we looked to Mt. Baker in our own backyard for PNW inspiration. Meet: The Muddy Baker.

 

To make the float

Place several scoops of ACME Ultra-Premium Dark Chocolate Ice Cream into a large glass. Slowly top with Aslan Brewing Co.’s American Stout. Slurp up a little foam and dig into the float using a long-handled spoon.

Stephanie Basilio